All Walks (Text Only Version)

 

Trail Walks

Canal/River Walks


Wainwright's Coast-to-Coast Top Of Page

Route
St Bees to Robin Hoods Bay
Distance
192 Miles ( 307 Kms )
Grade
Moderate to Very Strenuous
Walking Days
15-16 Days, walking 12-13 miles a day

The route was conceived by Alfred Wainwright, who believed that such is Britain's wealth of footpaths, bridleways, small roads, lanes and places of open access that there are any number of walks which can be taken without needing landowners' permission and without trespassing. This pathway traverses such magnificent walking areas as Ennerdale, Honister, Grasmere and Grisedale. The moors provide a stark contrast to the Lakes and their utter lack of adornment makes them an easy place to get lost. From Osmotherly you are on the North York Moors and the perennial flow of the countryside is neatly punctuated by the tiny Yorkshire villages which offer comfortable accommodation after a satisfying day's walking. As time passes the smell of the sea grows ever stronger, through Rosedale, Glaisdale, and Grosmont, and finally down to Robin Hood's Bay. When you reach it, the challenge of the Coast to Coast has been met.

South Downs Way Top Of Page

Route
Eastbourne to Winchester
Distance
108 Miles ( 174 Kms )
Grade
Moderate with some strenuous sections
Walking Days
8-10 Days, walking 10-13 miles a day

One of the first and still one of the greatest long distance designated walks in England. Justifiably one of the most popular walks in Southern England, it starts on open grassland at Eastbourne, with a gentle symphony of changing views and rolling chalk downs, and ends on wooded slopes at Winchester. The route at its highest points on Ditchling Beacon and Butser Hill gives time to reflect on the changing countryside along the route. It descends to river valleys and attractive villages where overnight stops can be arranged. A peaceful route where the feeling of space is heightened by the pure fresh air. There will almost always be the song of the skylark as an accompaniment to your walk.

Offa's Dyke path Top Of Page

Route
Chepstow to Prestatyn
Distance
177 Miles ( 285 Kms )
Grade
Moderate to strenuous
Walking Days
14-15 Days, walking 12-13 miles a day

Offa's Dyke Path is the 177-mile national trail following the man-made dyke between England and Wales. This impressive earthwork was built by King Offa of Mercia during the 8th century to mark the border with Wales. For over half its length the path keeps company with the dyke. Sometimes it is a great bank up to 25ft (7.6 metres) high and others it is no more than a hedgerow or a ridge across a ploughed field. At times it disappears completely. The path starts near Chepstow, on the Severn estuary, passing through the Wye Valley, the Black Mountains and the Radnorshire Hills. Chepstow, with its prominent Norman Castle; Lower Redbrook valley, where forges and farms were worked; the 13th century bridge at Monmouth; Hay-on-Wye, famous for books; Knighton - the halfway point - Welshpool, Llangollen, the Clwyd hills and Prestatyn; no two days are the same and the scenery is so diverse.

South West Way Top Of Page

Each section is planned to enable a car to be left at a central point and by using public transport you can return to it at the end of your holiday. For this reason the sections do not end exactly at county boundaries. Our route follows the traditional paths coastguards walked while patrolling the cliffs on the lookout for smugglers. On some sections the route diverts inland due to cliff erosion. Some parts are very rugged, with footpaths descending into a valley only to climb to the clifftop again. There are a number of river crossings, with lengthy detours if the ferries are not operational (they have a very short summer season). The ever-changing landscape with secluded coves of golden sands which only the walker can reach make these walks a memory to treasure.

South West Way - 1. North Cornwall coast path Top Of Page

Route
Bude to St. Ives
Distance
111 Miles ( 179 Kms )
Grade
Moderate, strenuous in places
Walking Days
9-10 Days, walking 12-13 miles a day

Bude is an interesting place to linger as there is a canal which was used for sea going vessels. There are also public transport connections from Exeter. A good place to start, finish or just have a day's rest. Most of the coastline is owned by the National Trust. The path contours the coves and hills past Crackington Haven, Tintagel, Port Isaac, Padstow, then back onto the cliff and the approaches to St Ives. At each step of the way the turbulent blue waters of the Atlantic pound the cliffs below.

South West Way - 2. South West Cornwall coast path Top Of Page

Route
St. Ives to Falmouth
Distance
86 Miles ( 138 Kms )
Grade
Strenuous
Walking Days
8 Days, walking 11 miles a day

The scenery is spectacular on this section of the path and very rugged underfoot. This section starts at St Ives with its alleyways and passages overlooked by houses perched on the hillside above. Numerous coves, headlands, surfing beaches, fishing villages and mining settlements are seen on the way to Land's End, now developed as a commercial enterprise. St Michael's Mount dominates Mounts Bay, near Penzance. The Isles of Scilly can be reached by helicopter from Penzance . . . an ideal rest day. After Land's End the walking is easier to the Lizard, which is famous for the multi-coloured Serpentine Rock, made into souvenirs for tourists. Flowers and butterflies are plentiful in summer and seals can sometimes be seen offshore. Lifeboat stations and some lighthouses can be visited.

South West Way - 3. South Cornwall coast path Top Of Page

Route
Falmouth to Plymouth
Distance
75 Miles ( 120 Kms )
Grade
Moderate to strenuous
Walking Days
6 Days, walking 12-13 miles a day

This part of the Coast Path is very scenic, with ferry trips over several rivers. It starts at one busy harbour and ends at another, with many small ones in between. Sometimes seals can be seen in the sea below the cliffs. During the nesting season the cliffs are very busy indeed. When you pass through the ancient port of Charlestown, near St Austell, you may see a sailing ship in the harbour. The route meanders over grassy hills and through little villages, finishing in a country park across the Tamar from Plymouth. The Cremyll Ferry travels across the river to the end of the walk.

Dorset Coast Path Top Of Page

Route
Seaton to Sandbanks
Distance
96 Miles ( 154 Kms )
Grade
Moderate to Strenuous
Walking Days
8 Days, walking 12-14 miles a day

From Seaton we follow the coastal path as it extends eastwards towards Lyme Regis. This section is quite strenuous walking which includes the famous landslide, now a nature reserve. From Lyme Regis to Charmouth is a Fossil hunters paradise. Then on to the 627ft (191m) headland of sandstone known as Golden Gap, the highest point on the South Coast of England, giving splendid views all round. At Abbotsbury, the famed Swannery and nature reserve are worth a visit. The Chesil bank becomes evident and with it the first sight of the Isle of Portland, a former Naval Base. An optional extra day walking around the island can be included in the walk. After Weymouth, the walking is strenuous from Osmington Mills as you approach Durdle Door to Lulworth Cove. If the ranges are open the walk follows the cliff, otherwise there is a detour. At Kimmeridge Bay the nodding donkey pumps oil from the shale. The last night is spent in Swanage and the walk ends along the beach at the Sandbanks Ferry.

Cotswold Way Top Of Page

Route
Chipping Campden to Bath
Distance
102 Miles ( 170 Kms )
Grade
Easy, some hills
Walking Days
7 Days, walking 13-14 miles a day

This route does not follow a historic trail but uses mostly footpaths and bridleways. Although not too strenuous, there are some steep ascents in parts. If you need a rest day, Cheltenham is a well-known spa town not far off the route. The walk is a mixture of hills with splendid views and mellow stone villages set in the lowlands. The Cotswolds are an Area of Outstanding Beauty. Years ago, they were an important area for sheep. There is much to interest walkers on this route - Bronze Age barrows, hill forts, mills, market towns, churches. Most of the churches and manor houses were built by people who made fortunes in the wool trade. Naturalists will not be disappointed as many unusual plants can be found along the way. In fact, most tastes are satisfied on this walk.

Dales Way Top Of Page

Route
Ilkley to Bowness
Distance
80 Miles ( 123 Kms )
Grade
Easy, some hills
Walking Days
7 Days, walking 11-12 miles a day

The Dales Way is a long-distance route which follows easy riverside paths. There is also some moorland walking. The walk starts from Ilkley and passes through interesting villages and towns to end in Bowness. There is much to see - historic stone circles, manor houses, Quaker meeting houses, pack horse bridges, churches. A notable landmark is the Ribbleshead Viaduct, over which the Settle to Carlisle railway runs. This walk links two national parks, the Lake District and the Yorkshire Dales. Near the rivers, wild flowers, trees, butterflies and birds may be seen.

St Cuthbert's Way  Top Of Page

Route
Melrose to Lindisfarne
Distance
63 Miles ( 100 Kms )
Grade
Easy to Moderate
Walking Days
7 Days, walking 6-13 miles a day

The St Cuthbert's Way is a new long-distance path established in 1996 linking the Southern Upland Way at Melrose in the Scottish Borders on route to Kirk Yetholm (finish/start of the Pennine way) and finally to the Island of Lindisfarne. It was here St Cuthbert lived for a period, when he became famous for his healing powers. He then moved first onto St Cuthbert's Isle, just off Holy Island as he was aware of the need for more solitude. Later he moved again to Inner Farne, where he died. His body was then returned to Lindisfarne. The journey starts at Melrose Abbey to St Boswells along a Roman Road to the outskirts of Jedburgh. From here to Morebattle and across the Cheviot hills to the old town of Wooler. The final leg is via Fenwick and onto the Causeway to holy Island, where timings have to coincide with low water.

Pembroke Coast Path  Top Of Page

Route
St.Dogmaels to Amroth
Distance
155 Miles
Grade
Moderate to Strenuous
Walking Days
13 Days, walking 10-13 miles a day

This is a walk for the amateur geologist as well as the long distance walker. The coastal scenery is spectacular and varied. Flowers, birds, butterflies, and even seals can be enjoyed while walking. There are many historical features from Iron Age to Industrial archaeological remains. Little harbours and coves abound. St.David's is the smallest cathedral city in the United Kingdom. The path can be strenuous in parts but the mileages are calculated to allow for this.

Hadrian's Wall Path  Top Of Page

Opened in May 2003, this trail is an 8 day walk, but can be extended to enable visits to various Roman Sites.

Route
Wallsend to Bowness on Solway or Bowness on Solway to Wallsend
Distance
84 Miles
Grade
Moderate
Walking Days
8 Days, walking 10-12 miles a day

If you are intrigued by the Romans this is the ideal walk for you The path follows busy quaysides, old railway tracks, passing through interesting villages. Along most of the path there are some remains of the wall to be seen. At Housteads the way is alongside the Roman Fort through magnificent scenery of the National Park. Birdoswald nearby houses the Military Museum and so onto Carlisle. The last part is across the flat marshes of the Solway Firth, following the line of yet another railway and canal now disappeared except for a sea lock at Port Carlisle.

Kennet and Avon Canal Top Of Page

Route
Bath to Reading
Distance
75 Miles ( 120 Kms )
Grade
Easy, flat walking on towpath
Walking Days
6 Days, walking 12-13 miles a day

Starting at Thimble Mill, the first lock, the attractions of this walk include Claverton Pump, Avoncliffe Aqueduct, Devizes' 29 locks and Crofton Pumping Station. The canal winds through lovely countryside with many villages and towns along the route, joining the River Thames at Blakes Lock, Reading, where there is an interesting museum. Much of this canal is very rural, with abundant birdlife, butterflies and flowers.

Brecon and Abergavenny Canal Top Of Page

Route
Newport to Brecon
Distance
42 Miles ( 68 Kms )
Grade
Easy, flat walking on towpath
Walking Days
4 Days, walking 10-11 miles a day

A gentle towpath walk. The canal leaves Newport and soon branches under the motorway from the disused Crumlin Arm. In Cwmbran the canal disappears under the dual carriageway. The Toll House at Pontymoile heralds the start of the navigable route to Brecon, passing wharfs at Goytre, Llanfoist and disused lime kilns near Llangattock, on to Llangynidr Locks and Talybont Liftbridge. The Brynach Aqueduct over the River Usk leads to the last lock before the market town of Brecon. There are many views of the mountains along the route.

The Thames Path Top Of Page

Route
Putney Bridge to Lechlade
Distance
156 Miles ( 251 Kms )
Grade
Easy flat walking on the towpath
Walking Days
13-15 Days, walking 12-14 miles per day. This can be arranged as two 
separate weeks if required

This great river runs through London starting near the old London Docks with a recent addition, "The Globe Theatre" across the river, which was rebuilt near the original site to an almost identical layout including the stage and the pit still exposed to the skies for Shakespearean plays. Our starting point is Putney Bridge the home for the famous Oxford and Cambridge boat race in the spring. As the walk progresses you will pass the famous Kew gardens. Then Hampton Court palace built by Cardinal Wolsey for Henry VIII the gardens have been restored, also the medieval kitchens. Soon the towpath reaches Runnymede where the Magna Carta was signed, now overlooked by the Kennedy Memorial. Windsor is the next landmark and Windsor castle, where the Queen lives for part of the year. At Henley-on-Thames international rowing events take place each year. After Reading the landscape changes with more fields trees, locks, and bridges. You may like to stay a while in the university town of Oxford. The route is even more rural after Oxford. From Swinford the path switches from North to South and at times is diverted away from the river. After Lechlade the path follows minor roads to Cricklade then it winds its way through the Cotswold water park to Thames Head and the official end of the walk.


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